Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeons Discuss Scars and Healing After Surgery

Scars after surgeryWhen it comes to plastic surgery, the scars after the procedure vary from person to person. There are many factors which influence healing after surgery and the way we scar. The type of scar is partially based on age and genetics. While younger patients have healthier and tighter skin, this can create added tension on the scar. Older patients have skin that is lax but that doesn’t mean they necessarily heal easier. Some ethnicities, such as African Americans and Asians, have thicker skin and are more prone to developing thicker scars that are raised. Over time, surgeons have learned how to minimize the development of scars and efficient ways to treat them.

Scar Location

The location of the incision, or injury, will greatly affect how a wound heals and the type of scarring that occurs. Dr. John Layke, a Beverly Hills plastic surgeon, told newbeauty.com, “There are certain areas of the body that tend to heal poorly—over a joint, in the back, and in an area called the chest box—in between the nipples up to the clavicles. Procedures that are over a joint or the ones that cause the most tension will lead to more scarring—any procedure that tries to lift while the body is pushing outward. For example, a lift with an implant. The implant is pushing outward, but the lift is pulling inward, so there’s that push/pull relationship that causes tension.” Scars that don’t heal properly, or are positioned over a joint and causing restricted movement, may require scar revision to help regain a range of motion.

Tension

According to Dr. Payman Danielpour, also a plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, “Tension is the single most important factor in wound healing. Incisions that are under a lot of tension have a higher chance of widening, and therefore, healing with a poorer aesthetic outcome.” He went on to tell newbeauty.com, “That is why when choosing incisional options, we place incisions in areas that have the least tension. The more tension the incision has, the higher chance it will want to split apart and therefore widen and heal with a hypertrophic [raised] scar, which is aesthetically unappealing.” Many doctors say this is very important during the early stages of wound healing. It is important for patients to follow their recovery guidelines and not do things that might pull on the incision, or newly healed scar, to cause further tension.

Silicone Sheeting

Along with following post-surgical recommendations, the surgeon may advise patients to use a silicone dressing to help the scar heal better. Silicone sheeting has been proven to help reduce scar formation and reduce the appearance of a raised, red scar. Silicone sheets cause an amount of pressure that can help flatten some scars. They also lock in moisture and help the scar heal. “Embrace” is a silicone dressing which combines tension relief, to protect the wound from body movement, and silicone to hydrate the tissue. Be sure to follow any instructions from the doctor on when, and how, to apply silicone sheeting for a flatter and less noticeable scar.

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How to Reduce Scars after Breast Surgery?

Scars on the breasts can occur from a biopsy, lumpectomy, mastectomy or implants. There are many different types of scars and each scar can appear pink or red in color as well as thick or bumpy. Patients must also understand the trauma inflicted on the tissue, during a surgical procedure, can also create scarring on the inside. While scarring on the outside will fade over time, the fibrous tissue on the inside may cause lumpiness, tightness or discomfort. However, there are some ways to reduce scarring on the breasts that patients can discuss with their doctor.

Surgical scar after breast surgery

Silicone Treatments

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, silicone-based bandages or sheeting can reduce the density of a scar. However, this treatment should be used daily for best results. Silicone creams and gels may also be beneficial to treat scar tissue and may be easier to apply on the breasts.

Scar Tissue Massage

Approximately 2 weeks after breast surgery, or when the incisions have healed, patients may begin massaging the scar tissue with lotion, oils or creams. Scar tissue massage can help remove built-up collagen from the surgical site for a flatter, more flexible scar. Scar massaging also alleviates lumpiness and the itchy sensation most scars have. Apply gentle pressure with two or more fingers along the scar, and in the surrounding areas, to see the best results.

Cortisone Treatments

Daily use of cortisone cream or creams containing cortisone can help shrink the size of a scar. However, the wound should be fully healed before using this type of topical medication.

Pressure Bandages

The American Academy of Dermatology states that using pressure bandages can help flatten hypertrophic scars. However, this method also requires daily use and can take several months before results are seen.

Vitamin E

Taking a daily supplement of vitamin E may help to reduce the amount of scar tissue that can form around the implant. Its powerful antioxidant abilities can repair damaged skin and fight inflammation. Vitamin E can also be found in certain oils, grains, nuts and wheat germ. It can also be found in liquid form and/or many skin care creams.

Avoid the Sun

Avoid sun exposure to new scars since the UV rays can slow the healing process and cause a dark discoloration. Furthermore, the new skin is extremely sensitive and can burn easily. Therefore, patients should apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher whenever going outdoors.

Laser Therapy

If a scar does not heal properly, patients may be able to reduce a scar via laser treatment. Laser therapy works by removing the outer layers of skin to promote new cell growth and a smoother texture.

Surgically Removed

Deep scarring, which cannot be remedied with tissue massage or other methods, may need to be surgically removed. Scar tissue that becomes so bad that it squeezes the implant and causes pain, or a shifting of the implant, is called capsular contracture. The surgeon will need to excise the scar tissue and may need to replace the implant.

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What is Laser Scar Removal?

Scars are the way the body naturally repairs the skin from an injury, burn, bite, acne or surgery. While everyone wants the healing, nobody wants the scars. Laser scar removal uses laser technology to improve or minimize the appearance of a scar. There are various lasers available to treat a wide range of skin and scar types. A plastic surgeon, or certified dermatologist who specializes in laser scar removal, can help you determine which type of scar treatment is best for you.

Scar removal by laser

Types of Laser Treatments

Laser Resurfacing involves using a high-powered laser to minimize the appearance of the scar by removing the top layers of skin. The procedure can be performed as an outpatient procedure in a skin laser clinic or doctor’s office and only takes between 1 and 2 hours. A local anesthetic numbs the area and goggles will be placed over the eyes to protect them from the bright light. During the procedure, the doctor will move the hand-held laser wand over the scar to remove the damaged skin cells. Each pass of the laser eradicates more cells. As the laser penetrates the scar, it also reaches the middle layers of skin and can provide smoother, tighter skin.

The doctor may choose between two skin resurfacing lasers and they are the CO2 laser or the Erbium: YAG laser. Both lasers work well for most scars including acne scars.

  • The CO2 laser is more powerful than the Erbium: YAG laser and can penetrate far deeper into the skin. This type of laser is best for removing thick and deep scars. The procedure can be slightly more painful and the recovery time is a little longer at about 2 weeks.
  • Erbium: YAG laser is often used to treat shallow scars. Since it is not as powerful as the CO2 laser, there is less sedation needed and less pain. Furthermore, the recovery time is also minimized at about 1 week.

Fractionated laser resurfacing uses tiny beams of light which penetrate deep into the skin. The laser causes microscopic holes where the damaged skin cells used to be. These holes stimulate collagen production and the creation of fresh, new skin cells. This type of laser allows for a quicker recovery since the surrounding skin is left unharmed. Because it is a less invasive technique, this type of procedure only requires topical anesthetic. Plus, there is little to no recovery time. On the other hand, fractionated laser resurfacing cannot produce the same immediate results that laser resurfacing can provide. Therefore, additional procedures will be needed for best results. You may need 3 to 5 sessions at one week apart.

Non-ablative laser resurfacing involves using infrared lasers to heat the inner layers of skin to encourage collagen production and produce fresh skin cells to replace the damaged cells on the scar. The heat from the procedure can be slightly painful, as the laser moves across the scar, but a cooling spray will be released with each pass. This cooling spray prevents any damage to the surface of the skin. This type of laser treatment can be done in a doctor’s office and only takes about 15 to 30 minutes per treatment. However, you may need 4 to 6 sessions to benefit from this type of laser and it can take months before you see the results.

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How To Avoid Scars

Unless you cloak yourself in bubble wrap and tape yourself to the couch, you will end up with a scar at some point. Precautions, such as wearing gloves when working in the garden or protective gear when bicycling, can help to circumvent scrapes and cuts which lead to scarring. It is strange to think that scarring is not supposed to be a bad thing. Scar tissue is the body’s way of healing itself after surgery or an injury but nobody is pleased to see a scar form. Scars that are raised, red, itchy or wide may need a form of scar revision to minimize their appearance. However, the best way to avoid a scar is to treat the wound properly. While a doctor will establish proper wound care for a surgical scar, here are some tips to help you avoid scar development:

  • Cleanse the Wound

Wound Care to Avoid ScarsIt is very important to keep the wound properly cleansed. Gently wash the wound with a mild soap and lukewarm water to get rid of germs and remove debris. If dirt and particles remain in the wound after a thorough washing, use tweezers to carefully remove them. Be sure to clean the tweezers with alcohol before removing the fragments. A wound that is clean will heal quicker, neater and is less likely to develop into a scar than one that becomes infected. Hydrogen peroxide and rubbing alcohol are not recommended since alcohol can be irritating to damaged skin and hydrogen peroxide destroys white blood cells needed to repair the wound.

  • Keep the Wound Moist

While some people say to let the wound have air so it can scab over, scabs are not our friends. Scabs allow scarring to occur so keeping the wound moist and covered is a better way to avoid scars. Moisture prevents a hard scab from being able to form since it slows the development of new tissue but it does allow cells to regenerate faster. If the wound is properly cleansed, don’t grab Neosporin or other ointments since they can impede wound cleansing. Instead, apply petroleum jelly to the wound and a bandage. Keeping the wound moist with petroleum jelly can keep the scar from becoming too large, deep or itchy. If a scab does form, do not pick at it. Otherwise, you are likely to get a worse scar.

  • Cover it Up

Research has shown that keeping a bandage on a wound speeds healing by as much as 50%. Cleanse the area, reapply ointment and change the bandage daily to keep the wound clean and free of infection as it heals. Anyone who has sensitive skin can use a non-adhesive gauze pad and paper tape. A large cut should be examined by a doctor to determine whether stitches are needed. However, you may be able to close small cuts or gaps with a butterfly bandage. Butterfly bandages can help keep a fresh wound closed for better healing and minimal scarring. These bandages can be found at most drugstores.

  • Consider Silicone Gel

If you have large scrapes, burns, sores or persistent redness, you may want to consider using silicone gel sheets or hydrogel. Silicone gel sheets can help to promote healing while minimizing scar formation. Silicone gel sheets can also be used after a scar has already formed. They can help to flatten raised scars and tone down redness and/or itchiness. Follow the directions on the package or the advice of a doctor for changing the gel sheet.

  • Eat Healthy and Exercise

Eating a balanced diet and getting exercise can help ward off scars. While protein and vitamins are essential to the body, getting adequate zinc is especially important for wound healing. Grab some roasted pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, peanuts, Brazil nuts, lean beef or dark-meat turkey to help avoid scarring. Exercise can speed the healing process because exercise increases circulation and regulates the immune system and hormones that influence the healing process.

  • Apply Sunscreen Religiously

Once the wound has healed, frequently apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen whenever going outside. The sunscreen should be a SPF of 30 or more since scars are very vulnerable to sunburns. Scar tissue lacks the ability to develop a tan since it has less pigment than the surrounding skin. Furthermore, UV rays are known to slow healing since they interfere with new collagen production. Sunscreen may help to decrease red or brown discoloration and help the scar fade at a quicker rate.

Scar Tissue after Surgery

People often wonder what their scar is going to look like after surgery. Surgeons can give a general idea of the size, color and appearance of the scar but each person heals differently. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), scar tissue is usually thicker than the surrounding skin as well as pink or red in color. However, the appearance of a scar largely depends on the size and depth of the wound. Also, the age of the patient, location of the wound and the time it takes for the wound to heal are all aspects which can influence the look of the scar.

Understanding Scar Tissue

After Surgery ScarsAfter surgery, the body uses its ability to create scar tissue to heal the new wound. However, excess scar tissue beneath the skin can be troubling even after the wound has healed. The tough, fibrous tissue can cause pain and significantly reduce function or range of motion. This decrease in function may transpire due to the direction of the incision and/or the depth of the wound.

For example, bend and straighten the elbow. The folds that form in the skin are known as Langer’s lines. These lines characterize the direction and orientation of the collagen fibers. While making an incision parallel with the Langer lines can happen in some cases, it is not always possible. This is because most surgeries involve cutting into multiple layers of the anatomy. Each layer that is severed must be repaired. As the collagen fibers begin to rebuild, they tend to be erratic and can cause a tightening which can impede some functions. Likewise, surgery on the knees, wrists, shoulder or ankles is often meant to improve movement and function but scar tissue that forms around the joints can create the opposite effect. Frozen shoulder, a condition some patients experience after surgery, is a buildup of scar tissue around the shoulder joints that can cause irritation and inflammation. This can lead to post-surgical pain and impair the range of motion.

Abdominal and Pelvic Adhesions

Abdominal incisions, such as when a person has their appendix removed, can cause abdominal adhesions. Adhesions are bands of tissue which form between the abdominal tissues and the organs. These bands often cause the usual slippery internal tissues and organs to stick together. This can lead to a twisting and pulling of the small or large intestines which create bowel obstruction and chronic pain. Likewise, pelvic adhesions can form after gynecological surgery and cause pain and infertility in some cases. Using certain surgical techniques, such as creating adhesion barriers, can help reduce these pelvic adhesions. Therefore, patients are encouraged to ask their surgeon how they plan to minimize the risk of adhesions.

Scar Prevention and Treatment

Prior to any surgery, patients should ask how much scarring is expected and what type of preventative treatment is recommended. Anytime the patient is undergoing a procedure that involves surgically manipulating a joint area, the surgeon will recommend moving the joints immediately after surgery. This improves function and also helps to prevent excess scar tissue from forming. Patients are always advised to follow post-surgical recommendations and perform targeted exercises to help stretch the skin and guide joints back into the proper position. Massage therapy and ultrasound therapy may also be used to help soften scars and maintain motion after surgery. Although these scar prevention treatments can help to eliminate an accumulation of scar tissue in many patients, some people still develop debilitating scar tissue. Nevertheless, there are numerous scar treatment options which can improve or lessen the appearance of scars and help patients regain motion.

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Why Scars Heal Differently on the Body

Have you ever noticed that you can have scars on different parts of your body and they look dissimilar? When an injury breaches the layer of the skin, the skin cells and blood vessels become damaged and the body sends excess collagen to quickly repair the region.

Healing Rate of Different Types of Scars

This is the body’s way of forming a barrier to protect it from bacteria and germs. Depending on the amount of collagen sent, it can cause the wound to heal differently and result in scar tissue that looks and feels unlike the rest of the skin. Other factors that impact how a scar heals include:

  • Genetics
  • Age
  • Lifestyle
  • Size and depth of the wound
  • Treatment methods
  • Location of the wound

Below is a quick rundown of different areas of the body and how scars normally heal in these regions.

Knees and Elbows

The knees and elbows are prone to heavy scarring since they are constantly being stretched. Therefore, the skin cannot properly regenerate and heal. The scar tissue may constrict mobility over the joints since the tissue becomes tight and less pliable. Severely limited mobility or pain may require scar revision surgery to improve functionality.

Chest and Shoulders

Per the National Institutes of Health, the chest and shoulder regions have the poorest results when it comes to extensive scarring because areas of tension produce thicker scars which appear more noticeable.

Legs

Scars tend to be thicker and more prominent on the legs since the skin is normally tighter and tougher than other parts of the body. Scars on the legs are inclined to be hypertrophic scars. Hypertrophic scars can be red in appearance and are raised above the surface of the skin.

Abdomen and Stomach

Scars on the abdomen and stomach generally heal well leaving a thinner, flatter scar. Surgical scars can usually be placed below the waistline or bikini line and are rarely seen while wearing everyday clothing. Additionally, this placement keeps the scar protected from the sun for optimal healing and to avoid hyperpigmentation.

The Mouth

When it comes to scars, the inside of your mouth is the best at healing. The intraoral tissue stays moist and can regenerate quickly. However, it is critical to keep the area clean to avoid infection. An infection will slow down scar formation and may generate a larger, denser scar.

Ears

A scar on the ear is generally thick and more prominent than others. This type of scar is generally a keloid scar. Keloids can be found on any part of the body but are common after an ear piercing. Like hypertrophic scars, keloids are red and raised. Unlike hypertrophic scars, keloids extend beyond the edges of the wound. Keloid scars can be minimized with pressure and topical scar treatments.

Preventing and Treating Scars

To keep scars at bay, you should keep the wound clean and moist until it has healed. Serious burns or deep cuts should be evaluated and treated by a doctor. Post-op instructions should be followed as directed to help minimize scarring. Silicone scar treatments can minimize scarring or reduce scars that have already formed. There are many different types of scar treatments available and each type of scar may respond differently to certain treatments. Consult with your doctor about which treatment might be right for your scar.

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Are Scar-less Wounds Possible In The Future?

No Scar Incision

Have you ever stopped to think about how miraculous the human body really is? Each component in the body works in different ways to heal itself, sustain functionality and maintain its own lifecycle. The skin can heal the most horrific wounds leaving only scar tissue after it heals. Although it is effective mechanism, scar tissue is not visually appealing. Luckily, the possibility of scar-less wounds is making headlines thanks to to a recent study by The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The University conducted a study using mice and human skin samples to do what was previously believed to be impossible. The team of scientists is confident that they discovered a means that allows skin to regenerate using fat cells. “Essentially, we can manipulate wound healing so that it leads to skin regeneration rather than scarring,” stated George Cotsarelis, MD, the Milton Bixler Hartzell Professor of Dermatology at Penn and chief investigator of the project.

Adipocytes are fat cells which are normally found in the skin but are lost when wounds heal as scars. Consequently, the most common cells found in the tissue during wound healing are myofibroblasts which are thought to only create scar tissue. Researchers also know that scar tissue does not have any hair follicles which gives it an atypical appearance from healthy skin. The research team used these distinctive features as the foundation for their thesis to manipulate the myofibroblasts into fat cells that won’t cause scarring. “Typically, myofibroblasts were thought to be incapable of becoming a different type of cell,” Cotsarelis stated. He went on to add that “our work shows we have the ability to influence these cells and that they can be efficiently converted into adipocytes.”

During the study, the researchers found that they must influence the tissue to regenerate within a specific time period after the wound occurs. Otherwise, they lose the opportunity and a scar will form. To determine the window of opportunity, researchers had to discover where the signals were coming from. Eventually, they determined that Bone Morphogenetic Protein can instruct the myofibroblasts to convert into fat. They also found that the key is to regenerate hair follicles first and then the fat will regenerate in response to the signals from those follicles. In other words, the study showed that fat and hair develop separately but cannot develop independently. The hair follicles form first but the fat will not form without the new hairs. Converting the surrounding myofibroblasts by regenerating the hair follicles is crucial to creating fat cells. Once the new fat cells are formed, they are identical to the pre-existing fat cells. This discovery has opened the door to the possibility of scar-less wounds. Adipocyte loss, or fat loss, is a natural result of aging which results in saggy skin, gauntness and wrinkles. The loss of adipocytes is also a known side effect of certain medical conditions and treatments including HIV treatments.

The study is still in its earliest stages and was merely used to demonstrate proof of the concept. The experiment has not reached the point of successful hair follicle growth from a wound on a living human. Until then, doctors and patients can still use various types of scar treatments including injectable fillers, laser treatments and dermabrasion.

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Why Scars Heal Differently on the Body

Have you ever noticed that you can have scars on different parts of your body and they look dissimilar? When an injury breaches the layer of the skin, the skin cells and blood vessels become damaged and the body sends excess collagen to quickly repair the region. This is the body’s way of forming a barrier to protect it from bacteria and germs. Depending on the amount of collagen sent, it can cause the wound to heal differently and result in scar tissue that looks and feels unlike the rest of the skin. Other factors that impact how a scar heals include:

  • Genetics
  • Age
  • Lifestyle
  • Size and depth of the wound
  • Treatment methods
  • Location of the wound

Abdomen Scar healing process

Here is a rundown of different areas of the body and how scars normally heal in these regions:

  • Knees and Elbows

The knees and elbows are prone to heavy scarring since they are constantly being stretched. Therefore, the skin cannot properly regenerate and heal. The scar tissue may constrict mobility over the joints since the tissue becomes tight and less pliable. Severely limited mobility or pain may require scar revision surgery to improve functionality.

  • Chest and Shoulders

Per the National Institutes of Health, the chest and shoulder regions have the poorest results when it comes to extensive scarring because areas of tension produce thicker scars which appear more noticeable.

  • Legs

Scars tend to be thicker and more prominent on the legs since the skin is normally tighter and tougher than other parts of the body. Scars on the legs are inclined to be hypertrophic scars. Hypertrophic scars can be red in appearance and are raised above the surface of the skin.

  • Abdomen and Stomach

Scars on the abdomen and stomach generally heal well leaving a thinner, flatter scar. Surgical scars can usually be placed below the waistline or bikini line and are rarely seen while wearing everyday clothing. Additionally, this placement keeps the scar protected from the sun for optimal healing and to avoid hyperpigmentation.

  • The Mouth

When it comes to scars, the inside of your mouth is the best at healing. The intraoral tissue stays moist and can regenerate quickly. However, it is critical to keep the area clean to avoid infection. An infection will slow down scar formation and may generate a larger, denser scar.

  • Ears

A scar on the ear is generally thick and more prominent than others. This type of scar is generally a keloid scar. Keloids can be found on any part of the body but are common after an ear piercing. Like hypertrophic scars, keloids are red and raised. Unlike hypertrophic scars, keloids extend beyond the edges of the wound. Keloid scars can be minimized with pressure and topical scar treatments.

Preventing and Treating Scars

To keep scars at bay, you should keep the wound clean and moist until it has healed. Serious burns or deep cuts should be evaluated and treated by a doctor. Post-op instructions should be followed as directed to help minimize scarring. Silicone scar treatments can minimize scarring or reduce scars that have already formed. There are many different types of scar treatments available and each type of scar may respond differently to certain treatments. Consult with your doctor about which treatment might be right for your scar.

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Don’t Be Ashamed Of Your Scar

Be Proud of Your Scar

Everyone reacts differently to having a scar. Some people simply accept having a scar as part of their appearance while others work to find ways to treat or remove it. One thing everyone should realize is that there is no reason to be embarrassed about having a scar. The current hit song, “Scars To Your Beautiful,” addresses this very issue.

Don’t believe there is nothing to be ashamed of when it comes to having a scar? Here are 5 reasons you should not be ashamed of having a scar:

  1. The story they tell

Scars interest others and leave them wanting to know more about you. They are a daily reminder of your journey in life. The scar can be from an accident or even a birth mark scar you’ve had your entire life. Look at the scar as a way that your body shares your history with others.

  1. Scars can encourage others

Scars can raise awareness for a number of issues and causes. In fact, scars that are related to an illness can often give others the encouragement they need as they battle the same disease.

  1. They show the passage of time

Many scars tend to fade and change color as they heal. The appearance of your scar shows others how long you’ve had it as well as how far you’ve come in life since the scar first appeared.

  1. A scar can be educational to others

While you might not like to discuss the reason you have a scar, some people just can’t help asking questions about it. Talking about your scar can help others learn more about certain diseases or situations and even make them more open-minded.

  1. They make you unique

Scars can add character to your body as well as your personality. They make you just a little bit different than others and help you stand out in a crowd. Embrace your unique status and show others that you are someone to be noticed.

How the Sun Affects Scars

Sun and Scar

Did you know the sun can affect the appearance of scars both during the healing period and after they have healed? After the skin has been damaged and scar tissue forms, the new skin is very sensitive. Exposure to the sun can cause further inflammation in the tissue and create a multitude of side effects. Avoiding the sun helps with patient recovery by reducing the swelling, avoiding potential skin burns, minimizing tissue damage and scarring.

The sun plays a big part in how noticeable your scars will appear. It can darken a scar long after it heals and this is especially true for people who already have a dark skin tone. Many people believe tanning helps even out the skin tone between healthy skin and scar tissue to make the scar less noticeable. However, the UV rays of the sun can have a damaging and lasting effect on sensitive scar tissue. Healthy skin produces more melanin, or dark brown to black skin pigment, while tanning. The pigment absorbs the UV radiation and protects the skin cells from damage.

Scar tissue does not produce melanin which makes the scar tissue, as well as the surrounding skin, more susceptible to sunburn after a surgery or injury. Furthermore, scar tissue can sunburn more rapidly than healthy skin and alter the pigmentation of the scar tissue resulting in a discoloration or darkening of the scar. It can also cause the scar to thicken which creates the possibility of tissue damage.

The damage from UV rays can be permanent and the skin discoloration may never lighten to match the tone of the healthy tissue. Patients should completely avoid the sun for at least a week after surgery and limit any exposure thereafter.

It can take a full year for scar tissue to finally settle down. During this time, take precautions to protect the scar from harmful UV rays. Whenever possible, shield yourself from the sun to avoid exposure. Stay in the shade or cover up a scar with clothing. Sun hats and dresses are great for providing some protection but don’t forget to use sunscreen on a regular basis. This is especially true if the scar is on an area which can’t be covered easily. You should apply sunscreen each day before you go outside.

Be sure and use an SPF that will protect your scar from sun damage. An SPF number means the sun protection factor and an SPF of 30 or higher is recommended for the best results.